Chapter 1 Berkelman
  • writing makes us think more deeply
  • higher education tries to communicate and create knowledge
  • you'll use the skills, knowledge, and habits that you learn as an apprentice scholar throughout college and in your personal and professional life
  • this apprenticeship while enable you to think like a well-educated people do
  • writing can help you grow, but only if you use a more flexible and complex process that you have in the past
  • scholars typically move back and forth among the stages, repeating steps multiple times and at different points in the process
  • effective writing is not a magical or natural talent
  • you only need knowledge, practice, feedback, and motivation to develop your writing ability
  • you should never write the same way every time
  • there are 4 parts to the writing process-discover, drafting, revision, and editing
  • if you only write one draft, you lose the opportunity to revise and expand your thinking
  • it is important to prioritize
  • remember your purpose and audience
  • argument tells what we think and why we think that
  • scholarly arguments have real purposes
  • scholarly arguments address a specific audience
  • scholarly arguments belong to larger conversations, histories, and contexts that determine the rules for what counts as a good argument
  • scholarly arguments pursue ideal purposes
  • scholarly arguments address sophisticated, demanding audiences
  • the rhetorical situation-who? what? when? where? why? and how?
  • scholars must "overexplain" what they are saying
  • why does the topic matter?
  • how do we know what we know?
  • why do we believe what we believe?
  • how can we improve what we know and believe?
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