Chapter 4 Berkelman
  • starting with sources help us:
    • verify whether our work will yield something
    • begin collecting information to answer our research questions
    • provide context for our investigations
    • borrow methods from other scholars
    • identify views, assumptions, or conclusions
  • utilizing sources depends on whether the paper is a research or a persuasive paper
  • writing after research
    • begin with a specific problem or question
    • review scholarly publications
    • design and conduct some kind of investigation
    • report results of the research
  • writing typically follows research for experienced scholars
  • why to look through sources:
    • stability
    • credibility
    • reliability
  • credibility depends on the particular audience and situation
  • ask yourself:
    • who wrote this? what makes them credible?
    • what are the authors trying to achieve?
    • how do they support their claims?
    • is anyone profiting from this? who? how might money-making efforts influence the content?
    • when was rgis written?
    • will this still be here next month?
  • big topics need big research containers
  • how to summarize:
    • read the text
    • create a "reverse outline," or schematic, of the text's layout
    • select the most relevant points
    • write a summary
    • revise the summary
  • how to paraphrase:
    • read carefully
    • think about the content
    • rewrite the gist of what the source is saying
    • double check the original
    • cite the author
  • help generate ideas:
    • play the believing and doubting game
    • find a source with which you strongly disagree
    • create a table that compares and contrasts your sources
    • pair two sources in conversation with each other
    • look at one source through the "lens" of another source
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