Chapter 7 Berkelman
  • kinds of fallacies:
    • weak evidence
    • insufficiency
    • unqualified claims
    • irrelevance
    • changing the subject
    • straw man argument
    • truth as support
    • relying too much on credibility
    • getting emotional
  • fallacies do not build the best possible case
  • a qualification is a stated restriction that limits a claim's strength
  • qualifications help by:
    • weakening the verb
    • narrowing the subject
    • limiting the object
    • adding support
  • a common kind of relevance fallacy confuses correlation with causation
  • straw man argument: oversimplified, exaggerated, or simply inaccurate versions of opposing arguments
  • fallacies aren't necessarily false
  • it is important to anticipate objections to your argument, walk in the reader's shows, and identify the potential controversies
  • how to respond to the objections of the argument:
    • concede
    • refute
    • elaborate
      • incorporate more examples
      • respond to more objections
      • relate the argument to real-life contexts
      • discuss the larger implications of your argument
      • make connections to other related issues
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