Chapter 9 Berkelman
  • almost every scholarly paper is a research paper
  • it is important to fully understand our sources' content, intended purpose, and persuasive strategies before critiquing, disagreeing, or using them to support our arguments
  • copying from others denies you the opportunity to learn
  • plagiarism usually means copying someone else's words or ideas without giving credit to the author
  • always ask your instructor, in advance, about what kinda of collaboration she allows
  • you can not learn something new if you do not do the work
  • get to know your honor code
  • pay careful attention to how writers use their sources
  • maintain careful notes as you read and conduct research
  • do not be tempted to write your paper and then fill in the citations
  • do not procrastinate
  • frame quotes with:
    • an intro
    • an explanation
  • sources add:
    • why the quote is there
    • what it means
    • how it is related and supports your argument
  • how to elaborate on a source:
    • interpret the source
    • explain how the quote relates to your argument
    • tell readers what makes the quote significant
    • consider ways to make a source our own
  • paraphrasing:
    • original text
    • proper paraphrase
    • proper paraphrase with quotation
  • how to know when to cite:
    • always cite quotes and paraphrases
    • cite summaries too
    • cite statistics, dates, and other details
  • bibliographic citation includes everything that a reader would need to know to find the exact sources that you used
  • in-text citations appear right next to where you summarize, paraphrase, or quote from your source
Unless otherwise stated, the content of this page is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License