Chapter 9 How Do We Use Sources Responsibly As

For scholars, nearly every paper is a research paper.
or at least every paper presents an opportunity to conduct some kind of research
Write with integrity

  • copying from others denies you the opportunity to learn

Plagiarism
Unauthorized Collaboration

  • work with peers and colleagues, but always ask the instructor, in advance, about what kinds of collaboration she allows
  • Recycled Writing

You can't learn something new if you don't do the work
Tips for Avoiding Plagiarism

  • Get to know your honor code
  • As you read, pay careful attention to how writers use their sources
  • Maintain careful notes as you read and conduct research
  • Don't be tempted to write your paper and then go back and fill in the citations
  • Don't Procrastinate
  • Quote and Integrate Sources
  • frame quotations with an introduction and an explanation

Create a Conversation
create linkage between 1) why a quote is there 2) what it means 3) how it's related to, or supports, our arguement

  • Interpret the source
  • Explain how the quotation relates to our argument
  • Tell readers what makes the quotation significant
  • Consider ways to make a source our own

Paraphrasing
closely read and fully understand the source

  • Patchwriting: failed paraphrasing

Citing Sources
Scholars value accurate citations because they illustrate the genealogy of our work
-Writing will develop more quickly if you concentrate first on selecting good sources, analyzing and evaluating their content and responsibly integrating their words and ideas into your own writing
How do we know we need to cite something?

  • Always cite quotations and paraphrases
  • Cite summaries
  • Cite statistics, dates, and other details
  • Citation Fundamentals

Bibliographic Citations
A bibliographic citation includes everything that a reader would need to know to find the exact source that you need

  1. Author(s)
  2. Title(s)
  3. Publication information (When, where, and who published the source)

In-Text Citation
In-text citations appear right next to where you summarize, paraphrase, or quote from your source

  • Tells readers whose ideas are referenced

Three main citation elements

  1. Author name(s)
  2. Titles
  3. Publication Information

Keep track of whatever details you or your reader would need to retrace your steps to find each source again
Using Sources in Scholarly and Nonacademic Work
How much does each author use each technique?
How much of the article is the author's thoughts?
How do the scholarly arguments use sources differently than the nonacademic ones?
Citation Systems
What differences do you notice among styles?
What disciplinary values might influence these different details, such as the date placement?

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