Rhetorical Analysis Alex

Rhetorical Analysis Rough Draft

Is Google Changing Us?

In the article "Is Google Making Us Stupid" by Nicholas Carr there are several arguments made by the author for his claim that our use of the internet is changing our mind. The author himself has written a few different articles such as; The Shallows and The Glass Cage: Automation and Us, he has written for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and Wired. Some people who are familiar with his writing might compare his views in this article to his previous ones and form a conclusion about this article, if he had a specific view on one article but it is different in this one then that might cause some hesitation on whether or not to believe him.

The place where this was published on was an online website called The Atlantic, this might suggest that his intended audience was for people who read The Atlantic or just internet users in general, he also makes a point to stress that his friends were literary types so maybe his intended audience was literary types. Based on some of Carr's word choices the reader of this article is probably educated, a regular computer user, and someone who is of an older age. People who grew up without a computer, but now own one might realize the way they read read has changed, this might influence how they feel about this article, also if they use Google or the internet regularly then they might compare their own reading experiences to Carr's or they might get defensive.

The thesis was very explicit, the title he chose was what his idea is based on and everything he said afterword supported it. The author talked about his own experience with using Google and his lack of focus in reading because of it. His evidence is fairly scattered, there are paragraphs that have several claims and evidence. He has a few links scattered around to support his claim. Carr has a very scholarly tone, he doesn't joke around and he gets right to the facts. At one point he calls us "pancake people" spread thin but over a wide range of topics, he also describes his own reading process as being on a jet ski and zipping along the surface, these references in particular stuck out to me, they are pretty self-explanatory and describe what he is trying to say. His design seemed technical, he goes right in to his claims and evidence. There is only one image used in this article, it shows an internet cop pulling over a person for going below the minimum speed, this illustrates how our minds want information fast, we don't want to have to read for it thanks to the internet. The author was writing to point out what happened to him, how he and his friends can't enjoy reading a book slowly anymore because of the internet.

The writer wrote this article because he notices that he could no longer read through a book and enjoy it and read through it slowly, his mind skimmed over it and wanted the information now. He ended up tying it together with his use of Google and the internet, he would use these for his research. This problem mattered to him because he used to love reading, he would get very into what he was reading and now he can't focus, his mind starts to wander and he skims more and more, he also can't get as into a book as he used to be able to.

Carr's idea is that his use of the internet and, more specifically, Google is the cause of his inability to read and lose himself in a book like he once could. Throughout his article he uses different forms of evidence to support his idea. His idea is very obvious in the text but it is even more obvious in the title "Is Google Making Us Stupid? What the Internet Is Doing To Our Brains." With just the title an idea of what the article will be about and how the author views the topic can be formed.

Carr talks about his literary friends who all seem to be having the same problem he is, this is one of the ways he gets verification for his claim. He also talks about a study conducted at the University College London where the people being studied used two different online websites that allows them access to many different online resources. The people using these sites tended to skim the text and not read through fully. Carr uses this as another form of verification and evidence. Carr talks about how different mental circuits can be the cause, people who use an alphabet had different mental circuits than those who use ideograms, he proposes that the internet uses a different circuit so our mind tries to adjust. He does have some linkages, he says the mind is malleable, he then talks about how the internet is changing our circuitry, he uses the alphabet-ideogram example as a linkage.

Carr says that because of our use of Google and the internet we are becoming "pancake people" spread wide and thin. He also implies that we are losing our ability to read and think about things. He doesn't really offer a solution or a call to action, he is just informing us about what is happening.

Rhetorical Analysis Peer Review Alex T

Rhetorical Analysis Final Draft

Is Google Changing Us

While I was reading the article I decided that I liked the idea that Nicholas Carr provided, but I did not like what support he used to back up his claim. Throughout his article he has several claims without any support to back them up, he also had some support that doesn't seem to work with the claim. This makes me hesitant to really believe him and just see his idea as a theory.

In the article "Is Google Making Us Stupid" by Nicholas Carr there are several arguments made by the author for his claim that our use of the internet is changing our mind. The author himself has written a few different articles such as; The Shallows and The Glass Cage: Automation and Us, he has written for The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and Wired. Some people who are familiar with his writing might compare his views in this article to his previous ones and form a conclusion about this article, if he had a specific view on one article but it is different in this one then that might cause some hesitation on whether or not to believe him. I haven't read anything that he has done but looking at where his work has been published does make him seem credible to me.

The place where this was published on was an online website called The Atlantic, this might suggest that his intended audience was for people who read The Atlantic or just internet users in general, he also makes a point to stress that his friends were literary types so maybe his intended audience was literary types. Based on some of Carr's word choices the reader of this article is probably educated, a regular computer user, and someone who is of an older age. People who grew up without a computer, but now own one might realize the way they read read has changed, this might influence how they feel about this article, also if they use Google or the internet regularly then they might compare their own reading experiences to Carr's or they might get defensive.

The thesis was very explicit, the title he chose was what his idea is based on and everything he said afterword supported it. The author talked about his own experience with using Google and his lack of focus in reading because of it. His evidence is fairly scattered, there are paragraphs that have several claims and evidence. He has a few links scattered around to support his claim. Carr has a very scholarly tone, he doesn't joke around and he gets right to the facts. At one point he calls us "pancake people" spread thin but over a wide range of topics, he also describes his own reading process as being on a jet ski and zipping along the surface, these references in particular stuck out to me, they are pretty self-explanatory and describe what he is trying to say. His design seemed technical, he goes right in to his claims and evidence. There is only one image used in this article, it shows an internet cop pulling over a person for going below the minimum speed, this illustrates how our minds want information fast, we don't want to have to read for it thanks to the internet. The author was writing to point out what happened to him, how he and his friends can't enjoy reading a book slowly anymore because of the internet.

The writer wrote this article because he notices that he could no longer read through a book and enjoy it and read through it slowly, his mind skimmed over it and wanted the information now. He ended up tying it together with his use of Google and the internet, he would use these for his research. This problem mattered to him because he used to love reading, he would get very into what he was reading and now he can't focus, his mind starts to wander and he skims more and more, he also can't get as into a book as he used to be able to.

Carr's idea is that his use of the internet and, more specifically, Google is the cause of his inability to read and lose himself in a book like he once could. Throughout his article he uses different forms of evidence to support his idea. His idea is very obvious in the text but it is even more obvious in the title "Is Google Making Us Stupid? What the Internet Is Doing To Our Brains." With just the title an idea of what the article will be about and how the author views the topic can be formed.

Carr talks about his literary friends who all seem to be having the same problem he is, this is one of the ways he gets verification for his claim. He also talks about a study conducted at the University College London where the people being studied used two different online websites that allows them access to many different online resources. The people using these sites tended to skim the text and not read through fully. Carr uses this as another form of verification and evidence. Carr talks about how different mental circuits can be the cause, people who use an alphabet had different mental circuits than those who use ideograms, he proposes that the internet uses a different circuit so our mind tries to adjust. He does have some linkages, he says the mind is malleable, he then talks about how the internet is changing our circuitry, he uses the alphabet-ideogram example as a linkage. Carr also has some claims without any support, at one point when he mentions how we are reading more than people used to through cell-phones and digital media, how they used the TV more, and how it's a different kind of reading; this is three claims with no support to back it up. He also references people from the past such as Alan Turing whose paper was published in 1936, before the use of the computer, he also quotes Socrates who lived in ancient Athens, his statement has nothing to do with Google and how it is changing us, he also brings up Hieronimo Squarciafico an Italian humanist from the fifteenth century, all three of these he uses to show how with the invention of things such as the printing press and writing someone sees the evils and what might happen, what they don't see is how beneficial in the long run they are, his mentioning this makes me think that he is just like them, only sees the bad.

Carr says that because of our use of Google and the internet we are becoming "pancake people" spread wide and thin. He also implies that we are losing our ability to read and think about things. He doesn't really offer a solution or a call to action, he is just informing us about what is happening. After everything I have read I have decided that Carr's idea is interesting but it is not very credible and it is hard to believe.

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