Rhetorical Analysis El

Draft- Internet addiction has more recently become a big topic in the modern world. More and more people rely on the internet and social media for their daily lives than ever before. Is the excessive use of the internet and its services changing who we are as people? Nicholas Carr wrote about his experiences and changes he felt happening as his life with the internet took hold. He explained how he used to be an avid book reader but now finds it hard to focus on the simple task of reading. Basically the over use of the internet has dulled his experience when reading a novel making it harder to concentrate and be drawn in by literary genius.
I feel that this specific article was directed towards a large audience group, people who experience these troubles that are induced by the internet. Those who not only are affected negatively by daily web usage, but actually have an addiction to it, e.g. teenagers, and just all around normal people who do not feel these affects but are interested in the theory. Since so much people use the internet on a daily basis, this article creates a giant audience pool, enabling to attract readers from all kinds of different backgrounds.
The author really pushed his message as if trying to state it as a fact. I do however side with the author due to the fact that I was also an extremely voracious reader during middle and high school. I would spend hours each night reading until 1 am. Ever since my daily internet routine began, I have not been reading nearly as much as I used to. So I can see the authors worry about all this. I have not experienced a lack of concentration when reading a book that is doing a fine job of keeping me lulled into complacency, as long as the book is captivating I do not have any problem staying focused. That being said I feel that the author also may be a little bit biased. In my opinion the internet affects us all differently. We do not share all the same responses and actions. We all have a different response and reaction to our internet use, while many times similar, we are still different. The author cites an article by Marshall McLuhan that explains how the net seems to be chipping away at the capacity for concentration and contemplation. While I may not agree with the author wholeheartedly, I do recognize a problem when I see one. I do not believe that simple internet use is strictly evil, definitely not, in fact it is also good which I think the author kind of skimmed over or skipped. There is definitely a healthy balance, Its just a matter of finding that balance. We have become so used to staring at a screen that trying to read a paper novel is foreign to some people.

Final
As Carr dips into his implications about everyday internet use, he claims that in time our brains are re-routed and changed. That we may find it harder to focus on something that isn't on a screen, and that are brains aren't working as hard as they should be while we fritter our time away on the world wide web. I believe that the author provides a strong argument but doesn't come without a weakness. I feel that what he states is in fact true for many people but not in any way does this affect everyone in this capacity. There is without a doubt a happy medium to this problem and Carr should have explored that a little more but instead focused primarily on his own experiences.

The author, Nicholas Carr wrote this article to share his experiences and thought he has about everyday technology use and how it changes us as people. The title states "Is google making us stupid?" and by google I believe he is not just referring to the multinational corporation but the internet as a whole. Carr describes how his literary levels have declined overtime due to his reading habits decreasing. According to him, the internet is re-wiring our brains and making it harder for humans to focus on basic activities such as reading, among other things. Carr describes how the use of the internet isn't as demanding on our knowledge as other activities would be. For example, it takes only seconds to find a definition or answer a question by using the internet whereas one had to trek to a library to gather that information before the creation of the internet. What Carr is describing is how the internet puts our brain into a bliss without asking us to really challenge ourselves at times and can eventually depreciate our cognitive skills.
Carr reaches out to a wide variety of audiences with this article, but first and fore mostly I believe it is best geared towards people who also experience what Carr describes. This issue can relate to people of all ages. Teenagers are notorious for internet addiction, meaning they could very well be an intended audience. Also, not only teenagers but your'e average adult to who has made internet use a part of their everyday life. And people who are just interested in the affects of prolonged internet use and what it may do. The real reason that this article can reach such a large audience is the fact that the problem discussed is something that a lot of people can relate to, seeing how the internet has grown into this ocean of ideas and information.
The author really pushed his message as if trying to state it as a fact. I do however side with Carr due to the fact that I was also an extremely voracious reader during middle and high school. I would spend hours each night reading until 1 am. Ever since my daily internet routine began, I have not been reading nearly as much as I used to. I have not experienced a lack of concentration when reading a book that is doing a fine job of keeping me lulled into complacency, as long as the book is captivating I do not have any problem staying focused. That being said I feel that the author also may be a little bit biased. In my opinion the internet affects us all differently. We do not share all the same responses and actions. We all have a different response and reaction to our internet use, while many times similar, we are still different. The author cites an article by Marshall McLuhan that explains how the net seems to be chipping away at the capacity for concentration and contemplation. While I may not agree with the author wholeheartedly, I do recognize a problem when I see one. I do not believe that simple internet use is strictly evil, definitely not, in fact it is also good which I think the author kind of skimmed over or skipped. There is definitely a healthy balance, Its just a matter of finding that balance. We have become so used to staring at a screen that trying to read a paper novel is foreign to some people.
Obviously it wasn't until Carr experienced this phenomenon of what I would call "reduced cognitive ability due to prolonged internet usage", that he then decided to write an article about it. Perhaps it compelled him because he didn't even notice it happening or has seen it happen to multiple people, maybe both. And it very clearly mattered to him seeing as how his own literary skills seemed to be in decline and most likely the case was the same for a multitude of other people as well. Carr most likely felt he should share his ideas and opinions with others and maybe administer a response from someone in a similar situation and maybe even open the eyes of other people who haven't noticed anything yet. Carr explains how he talked to friends about his issue and had similar reactions from them stating that they had gone through this as well.
Looking back on this article I feel that Carr explains this problem very well and emphasizes its consequences based on personal experience. However I also think that while excessive internet use is a problem, there are of course people unaffected by these problems and Carr never really addressed that. As I stated above there is without a doubt a happy medium with daily internet life and simple cognitive skills. It all depends on how you as a person deal with this and if you are capable of finding that happy medium.

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