Rhetorical Analysis Kramer

Rhetorical Analysis-Rough Draft

The purpose of this article is to inform readers about how we are lacking in concentration when it comes to reading long articles or or books. The author points out that people typically skim the articles to find the information they need faster. He believes that the more people use the Web, the harder they have to try to focus on longer pieces of writing. Carr talks about how after just a few pages of a book his mind starts to wander. The audience of this article is anyone who reads The Atlantic and anyone who spends time online. The author of this article is Nicholas Carr. The genre of this article is educational because Carr is trying to tell people what he thinks about this topic. The context of this article is opinion because Carr is stating what he thinks about this topic. He talks about how he feel when he is reading. He feels like he cant concentrate after a few pages.

The catalyst for this article is how Google effects how well we focus on longer writings. This problem matters to Nicholas Carr because he feels like it has been harder for him to pay attention while reading lengthy articles and books. The title of this article is called "Is Google Making Us Stupid? What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains," which states how he feels about what Google is doing to our minds.

Carr mentions that when he was talking to his literary friends, they said they were having similar problems. He talks about how a blogger, named Scott Karp, confessed that he has stopped reading books altogether. Another blogger, Bruce Friedman, says "I now have almost totally lost the ability to read and absorb a longish article on the Web or in print." There was a five year research program, Carr mentions, that was conducted by scholars from University College London. Those scholars looked at computer logs, jotting down the behavior of visitors to two research sites. People who used these sites were exhibiting "a form of skimming activity." They would go from one source to the next and wouldn't go back to the same source twice.

He discusses the connection between his claim and support the best when he is talking about his own experience. Carr talks about the problems he and his friends are having and backs it up. Another very important link is when he was talking about the University College London study, because it pointed out everything he was saying. Some implications of this article could be that people need to limit their time on the internet. They need to do more research using books instead of relying on Google and other search engines.

Rhetorical Analysis Peer Review-Kramer

Rhetorical Analysis-Final Draft

The purpose of this article is to inform readers about how we are lacking in concentration when it comes to reading long articles or or books. The author points out that people typically skim the articles to find the information they need faster. He believes that the more people use the Web, the harder they have to try to focus on longer pieces of writing. Carr talks about how after just a few pages of a book his mind starts to wander. He wants to influence the younger people to start using books and other texts as opposed to the internet search engines.The audience of this article is anyone who reads The Atlantic and anyone who spends time online. Carr is writing for people of all ages, who use the internet more than they use books and other texts. The author of this article is Nicholas Carr for The Atlantic written in July/August of 2008. The genre of this article is educational because Carr is trying to tell people what he thinks about this topic. The context of this article is opinion because Carr is stating what he thinks about this topic.

The catalyst for this article is how Google effects how well we focus on longer writings. This problem matters to Nicholas Carr because he feels like it has been harder for him to pay attention while reading lengthy articles and books. The title of this article is called "Is Google Making Us Stupid? What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains," which states how he feels about what Google is doing to our minds.

Carr mentions that when he was talking to his literary friends, they said they were having similar problems. He talks about how a blogger, named Scott Karp, confessed that he has stopped reading books altogether. Another blogger, Bruce Friedman, says "I now have almost totally lost the ability to read and absorb a longish article on the Web or in print." There was a five year research program, Carr mentions, that was conducted by scholars from University College London. Those scholars looked at computer logs, jotting down the behavior of visitors to two research sites. People who used these sites were exhibiting "a form of skimming activity." They would go from one source to the next and wouldn't go back to the same source twice.

He discusses the connection between his claim and support the best when he is talking about his own experience. Carr talks about the problems he and his friends are having and backs it up. Another very important link is when he was talking about the University College London study, because it pointed out everything he was saying. Some implications of this article could be that people need to limit their time on the internet. They need to do more research using books instead of relying on Google and other search engines.

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