Spring 2014

Spring 2014 Argument and Exposition

English 2152 section 04


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This is a wiki for Argument and Exposition, an English course offered at Bemidji State University. For more information, please see the course description on our class 2014 Syllabus.

Some of you may find this interesting: "Coca-Cola Removing Controversial Ingredient from Powerade"


If you are a new Wikidot user, you might find the wiki syntax quick reference page useful


Name Pages

Emilie Brouse | Belinda Corniea | Kayla DeJong | Carly Dietrich | Jessica Dulz | Daniel Eldien | Autumn Flicek | Lukas Fox | Alex Gerondale | Courtney Haas | Michael Hanson | Sarah Hoit | Bob Kinne | Olivia Knutson | Adam Lorentz | Jacob Marcus | Matraca McKay | Rachel Modrow | Ali Morrow | Ryan Newhouse | Jake Slimp | Jordan Starr | Sean Streier | Rebecca Tuttle | Mitchell Vollhaber | Brittany Watschke | Hamann


Archived Class Information

January

January 13
Introductions, Syllabus, and Tentative Due Dates

January 15
Introduction to the wiki
Check to make sure your name is spelled correctly in the Name Pages.
Create a Wiki Name Page. Your wiki name page is due Friday, January 17.

Please note: my office hours today will end at noon.

January 17
Wiki Name Pages due at the start of class

What is argument? What is rhetoric?

Everyday Argument Assignment

January 20
MLK Jr. Day — no BSU classes

January 22
Everyday arguments debriefing
Rhetorical Situation Powerpoint

For Friday, read Backpacks vs. Briefcases -- Steps Towards Rhetorical Analysis and take notes on a wiki page (Notes Anna Hamann).

Remember, no face to face meeting on Friday, but check the wiki for information and assignment for the weekend

January 24
No face to face meeting today

For Monday: a rhetorical analysis of Robert Kennedy's Speech Announcing the Assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr using Lloyd Bitzer's theory (pages 48-49 of Backpacks vs. Briefcases).

Write a couple of semi-formal paragraphs describing the rhetorical situation using Bitzer's theory of the Rhetorical Situation (examine the exigence, audience, and constraints). You will need to do a little bit of research to find information about the context of this speech (just Google it).

  • Start a new assignment page titled Bitzer followed by your name
  • Examine the context by looking at the rhetorical situation:
    • Problem or “exigence” (purpose for communication —an "imperfection marked by urgency." In other words, why did he speak? Go beyond the obvious — it was more than just an announcement of Martin Luther King Jr.'s death)
    • Audience (those who are the (intended or unintended) recipients of the rhetorical message. The audience should be able to respond to the exigence. In other words, the audience should be able to help address the problem.)
    • Constraints (The constraints of the rhetorical situation are those things that have the power to “constrain decision and action needed to modify the exigence”)

For a refresher, review pages 48 - 49 from your reading for today.

Tag your page with the tag "Bitzer."

This is due by the start of class on Monday. If you have questions or get stuck, ude.etatsijdimeb|nnamaha#em liame.

January 27
no office hours today

Start a new page on your wiki name page titled Free Writes followed by your name.

First Free Write: Do you read food labels? If so, why? If not, why not? What information do you think should be included on food labels in the United States?

Bitzer recap, moving on to Aristotle

For Wednesday:
Read Safety of Beef Processing Method is Questioned

January 29
Free Write:
After reading the NY Times article, What information should be included on food labels? Who should decide what is included on food labels? Did reading the article change your mind, or make you think about food labeling in a different way?

ABC News report on Pink Slime

And for fun: Jon Stewart's reaction to Pink Slime (NSFW)

What types of appeals did you see in the article? What was his main claim? (What was his exigence?)

January 31
Free Write:
After reading the three articles about the pink slime debate, where do you fall on this issue? Should it be labeled differently? Which argument(s) did you find most compelling? Why? What preconceptions (baggage) did you bring with you to this debate that might be influencing your position?

For Friday:
Read responses to the Pink Slime debate:
"Pink Slime: What's Really at Stake?" from The Atlantic
and
"Why You should Learn to Love Pink Slime" also from The Atlantic

Start thinking about topics for your research this semester — what issue related to food do you want to analyze?

February

February 3
Go over Project 1 Annotated Bibliography

Finish group work — CRAAP test

Library databases and online research (hello Google scholar)

Google Search Tips

Evaluating Sources — CRAAP test

In groups:

  1. Sweet Surprise
  2. How Corn Syrup Might Be Making Us Hungry and Fat
  3. Mayo Clinic
  4. Mother Nature Network
  5. AMA Report

February 5

Library databases and online research (hello Google scholar and PubMed)

and

The Annotated bibliography will take longer than you think, so get started early.

For Friday
Read chapter 1 of your text, Writing with Sources.

Due Today
On the Food Issue Topics for Research page, enter at least one idea or area of research you are interested in pursuing, followed by your name. Just go into 'edit' mode on that page and type in your idea and name. You do not need to start your own page. Also, more than one of you will have the same idea — that is fine.

February 7
Chapter 1 of Writing with Sources

Work Day in the Lab

The Annotated bibliography will take longer than you think, so get started early.

February 10
Review Project 1 Annotated Bibliography Requirements

Notes on summaries:

  • Harvard
  • From Drew University
    • The purpose of the summary essay is to convey to others an understanding of a text you have read, without their having to read it themselves. Thus for your readers, your summary essay functions as a substitute for the source that you are summarizing. You don't want to misrepresent your source or mislead your audience. Certainly an important feature of the summary essay, then, is its fidelity to the source; you must represent your source accurately and comprehensively, with as little of your own interpretation as possible. (Anytime you read and repeat a source, of course, you are interpreting it; but the summary essay asks you to minimize your interpretation as much as possible. You should not add your own examples and explanations, for instance.)

Peer Review Day on Wednesday — Be ready to go with a complete draft of your project
Remember to tag your page.

February 12
Peer Review Workshop:

  • Start a new page on your Name Page titled Annotated Bib Peer Review followed by your name.
  • Select 2 of your entries from your annotated bib that you are proud of, have questions about, or feel represent your work in general. Copy and paste those entries to your new Annotated Bib Peer Review page.
  • At the top of your Annotated Bib Peer Review page, write 1 or 2 questions you have for your reviewers. Leave space for them to answer.
  • Then, copy and paste the following questions (don't go into edit mode to do this — you will all lock each other out. Do it from the 'outside' of the page):
    • Are the summaries detailed enough that you understand what the source is all about? Are there details that the writer included that are unnecessary to the summary? What questions are you left with after reading the summaries?
    • Did the reviewer evaluate the sources using the CRAAP test? Do you see criteria based judgements about each letter (currency, relevance,authority, accuracy, purpose)? What is missing?
    • Are the reflection sections complete enough that you understand how the writer responded to the sources? Could they include more information?
    • Based on these two entries, in what direction do you think the writer's research is going?
    • What questions are you left with after reading these entries?
    • What are these annotations' weaknesses?
    • What are these annotations' strengths?

Then, in groups of three, evaluate two other writer's work. The best way to do this is to leave your Annotated Bib Peer Review page up on your computer and move to different computers to review. Go into edit mode on the writer's page and type your responses right in their page, followed by your first name. The next reviewer can follow and type in their responses right after yours. You get credit for having your work reviewed, as well as reviewing the work of others. Help each other out.

Questions?

Have this done by 10 am Thursday, February 13.

February 14
Annotated Bibliography due by the start of class

Writer's Memo

Copy and paste the following to the top of your annotated bib page (from the 'outside' of the page):

  • I found this research to be particularly interesting:
  • This part of my annotated bibliography was surprisingly difficult:
  • Next time I would do this differently:

Then, spend a couple of minutes reflecting on your process in writing.

Check in evaluations

Start Debates. Yay!!!

Watch first 20 minutes of Intelligence Squared 'Obesity is the Government's Business

Discuss debaters — what worked, what didn't

What am I Looking for in an Effective Debate?
Debate Teams
First Debate Resolution for Teams 1 and 2
First Debate Resolution for Teams 3 and 4
First Debate Resolution for Teams 5 and 6

Debate Dates of Note

  • February 21 Debate Prep day in the library
  • February 24 Debates A and B
  • February 26 Debate C

No Face-to-Face meeting on February 28

Annotated Bibliography Grading Rubric

Process Work for the Annotated Bibs

February 17
NO BSU day classes

February 19
Arguing Cause Assignment

Free Writes:

  • What are the most direct causes of the exigence about which you are writing?
  • What economic or business conditions may play a role in this exigence?
  • What societal attitudes, fears, or values may have initiated it or indirectly supported it?

Wikis for debate — you all have the capabilities of starting a new wiki for your debate team

Friday is debate prep day. Before you leave here today, plan a place in the library you all will meet on Friday at 10.

Looking ahead to Friday the 28th, how many of you would like access to this lab and work in here?

For Wednesday, February 26, read:

  • Chapter 8, pages 169 - 203 (you can skip the essays, pages 171 - 186, unless you would like to read some sample causal arguments) in Inventing Arguments, 3rd ed. Copies of this text are on reserve at the library under ID# 215-003. Ask for it at the reference desk.

More information about debating:

I should have your annotated bib grades for you on Friday. Monday

February 21
Debate prep day in the library. Meet with your group at the library to plan your strategy.

February 24
Debate resolutions A & B (groups 1 through 4)

February 26
Debate resolution C (Groups 5 & 6)

MLA citation. Read:
*Purdue OWL MLA in-text citations: the basics
*Formatting quotations

Let's do block quotes on the wiki this way:

Just type > followed by a space and then the text you want to indent (go into edit mode to see this)

They entirely refused to have it in bed with them, or even in their room, and I had no more sense, so, I put it on the landing of the stairs, hoping it would be gone on the morrow. By chance, or else attracted by hearing his voice, it crept to Mr. Earnshaw's door, and there he found it on quitting his chamber. Inquiries were made as to how it got there; I was obliged to confess, and in recompense for my cowardice and inhumanity was sent out of the house. (Bronte 78)

February 28
Work day — No face to face meeting today

March

March 3
Debate debriefing
Work day

March 5
Review possible causal argument structures (chapter 8 from Inventing Arguments)

Remember, we are not solving the problem, just establishing that it exists, that we should care about it, and that you have identified the cause(s) of it. For an example of a causal (not casual) argument, check out what the BBC has to say about what is happening in Ukraine. You will notice they do not propose a way to solve the problem.

Work Day

March 7
Peer Review Workshop:

  • Start a new page on your Name Page titled Arguing Cause Peer Review followed by your name.
  • At the top of your Arguing Cause Peer Review page, write 1 or 2 questions you have for your reviewers. Leave space for them to answer.
  • Then, copy and paste the following questions (don't go into edit mode to do this — you will all lock each other out. Do it from the 'outside' of the page):
    • Does the argument answer the basic question: Why did this happen? What questions are you left with after reading the argument?
    • Does the writer establish that the problem exists and that we should care about it? What is missing?
    • What seem to be the main points of the argument?
    • Does the writer genuinely address opposition? What additional opposing viewpoints could the writer address? Can you imagine other objections to the argument?
    • What were your reactions to the text as you were reading it?
    • What is the argument's greatest weakness?
    • What is the argument's greatest strength?

Then, in groups of three, evaluate two other writers' work. The best way to do this is to add a link to your Arguing Cause Peer Review page on your Causal Argument page, then leave this up on your computer and move to different computers to review. Go into edit mode on the writer's page and type your responses right in their page, followed by your first name. The next reviewer can follow and type in their responses right after yours. You get credit for having your work reviewed, as well as reviewing the work of others. Help each other out.
Tag your page with the word 'cause.'

Questions?

Since none of you made arrangements with me prior to today, to get full credit for this you must have this complete by noon today.

Resolutions for 2nd Debate will be up by the end of the day today.
Debate Teams
Second Debate Resolution for Teams 2 and 3
Second Debate Resolution for Teams 4 and 5
Second Debate Resolution for Teams 1 and 6

Arguing Cause project is now due March 17.

March 10-14
Spring Break

March 17
Arguing Cause projects due by the start of class today

Writer's Memo

Copy and paste the following to the top of your annotated bib page (from the 'outside' of the page):

  • I found this part of my paper to be particularly interesting:
  • This part was surprisingly difficult:
  • Next time I would do this differently:

Then, spend a couple of minutes reflecting on your process in writing.

Check-in evaluations

Solution Proposal Guidelines

Second Debate Resolution for Teams 2 and 3
Second Debate Resolution for Teams 4 and 5
Second Debate Resolution for Teams 1 and 6

March 19

Plagiarism Powerpoint

Handout — Quoting others
In pairs interview each other and write up your partner's responses using three different ways to set up a quote. This is due at the end of class time today (it will count as process work in your proposal)

For Friday read "Citizens and Consumers" essay on D2L and Chapter 3 from your Writing with Sources text

March 21
Free writes:

  • What solution to your crisis can you propose? How will your solution address specific elements or causes of the crisis?
  • How is your solution particularly practical, logical, manageable, ethical, humane, or economical?
  • What else has been tried or proposed? Why is your solution the solution your audience should embrace?

"Citizens and Consumers"
In groups, answer questions 1- 6 on page 265 (you can skip #2 if you so desire). As a group, start a new page for this — assign a note taker.

structure of solution proposals

Decide as a team where you will be meeting in the library on Monday.

For Monday, read chapter 2 in Writing with Sources and take notes on a wiki page (either on your general notes page or set up a page just for this purpose)

March 24
Debate prep day in the library
Meet in the Library

March 26
Debate resolutions A & B

Causal Argument grades back

I have started going through your causal arguments to suggest edits as you keep working with these for your next piece of writing. I am about halfway through. If you are abandoning your topic, please let me know as soon as possible.

March 28
Debate resolution C
Sign up for conferences

March 31 - April 4
No face-to-face meetings. One on one conferences in my office this week. **HS 321
.
Check Conference Schedule

A Note on Suggested Edits to Causal Arguments
Any underlined sentence has a mechanical error in it somewhere (most likely punctuation). Find it. Fix it. If you can't figure it out come and talk to me.

Any underlined word or phrase is either a word choice issue or an awkward phrasing issue.

I've suggested edits or commented in bold. Read through those and let me know if you have any questions.

Words with a strike through are not really needed. Think about deleting those.

Again, these are just suggestions. It's your writing, so any changes are up to you.

April

April 7

suggestion — if you don't want the world and everyone in it to see my notes in your text, just revert to a previous version. You can always back up and check out my notes when you start revising your text

debate feedback:
eye contact
now that we're not freaking out — less reading more talking
cite your sources people

Debate Results and

Debate Suggestions for the third and final debate. Get together with a partner and discuss what debate resolutions you might like to see. Check out NY Times Room for Debate and IQ2 Debates Archive. Write and/or link on the Debate Suggestions page.

Commas, commas, commas!
A number of you are having comma confusion. Check out this page on the Purdue OWL, and then for fun, this goofy, student-directed video. (It does contain one comma error. If you can find the error, point it out and win the respect of your classmates.)

April 9
Some of you may find this article interesting: "At Former Hamm's Site, it's the Water -- for Fish and Veggies"
(Someone definitely had to write a stellar proposal for that operation)

No class — student achievement day

April 11
Hello arguers! I am out of town today, as I thought I might be, so Sarah Barott is filling in for me. You have an in class work day today. If you have questions for me, go ahead and post them here. I will respond as soon as I can!

Also think about:

  • Debate Suggestions for the third and final debate. Give me some feedback in regards to the resolution ideas you all came up with. I will be making a decision about those this weekend.

April 14
In class work day

This is a good time to review Solution Proposal Guidelines

April 16
Fletcher's Class

April 16
make sure you have tagged your proposal with the word 'solutions'
Peer review workshop
Start a new page titled Solution Proposal Peer Review followed by your name. Link to this new page at the bottom of your solution proposal draft.

Copy and paste the following onto your new page:

  • Do you as the writer have any questions for your reviewers? If so, post them here:
  • Reviewers:
    • Consider outside sources. Do they help support the writer's claims? Do the sources of support take over any portions of the writing and overwhelm the writer's voice?
    • Did the proposal anticipate and respond to all valid arguments (opposing viewpoints)? What additional counterarguments and/or concessions would be helpful?
    • Is the organization of the writing easy to follow?
    • What questions are raised in your mind after reading this proposal? Is anything missing?
    • What were the most memorable pieces of text?
    • What is the writing's greatest weakness?
    • What is the essay's greatest strength?

Find your peer review group based on your Topic. Make sure that you have two people review your work, and that you review the work of two other classmates.

I am going to give you all an extra day to revise your writing based on the responses provided by your peers today. Final versions of the papers are due for grade on Monday, April 21. This means, though, that I probably won't have them graded and back to you until our final date — Wednesday, May 7 at 1:00.

April 18
For your final debate:
Third Debate Resolution for Teams 1 & 4
Third Debate Resolution for Teams 2 & 5
Third Debate Resolution for Teams 3 & 6

make sure you have tagged your proposal with the word 'solutions'

Process Work for Solution Proposal

Filler is a dirty word…

At the bottom of your peer review page, spend a couple of minutes reflecting in writing about the feedback you received.

  • Does it help you re-vision your proposal?
  • If so, how? If not, why not?
  • Did you incorporate any of these comments into your revision of your draft?

Work time for revising proposals

April 21
Solution Proposal Due

Writer's Memo

Copy and paste the following to the top of your solution proposal page (from the 'outside' of the page):

  • I found this part of my paper to be particularly interesting:
  • This part was surprisingly difficult:
  • Next time I would do this differently:

Then, spend a couple of minutes reflecting on your process in writing.

Then, yellow sheet is the check-in evaluation. Questions are on the board. This one is (anonymous) feedback for me.

Third Debate Resolution for Teams 1 & 4
Third Debate Resolution for Teams 2 & 5
Third Debate Resolution for Teams 3 & 6

April 23
Debate prep day in the library

Meet in the Library

April 25
3rd debate resolution A

April 28
3rd debate resolution B & C

April 30
Last day of class

debate 3 grades and ballots back

course evaluations


General Course Info

Meeting Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays 10:00am - 10:50am in Hagg-Sauer 109

Instructor: Anna Hamann
Email: ude.etatsijdimeb|nnamaha#ude.etatsijdimeb|nnamaha
Office: HS 321
Office Phone: (218) 755-2821
Office Hours: 11 am - 1 pm Mondays and Wednesdays, or by appointment
Class Wiki

Syllabus
Tentative Due Dates

To insert images from a file on your computer:

OK, I figured out how to insert images from files on your computer. You first need to upload them to the page. Click on the 'file' button at the bottom of your page and upload the image file. Then insert it as you would an image with a URL, just type in the file name where you would the URL. You can see how I added the picture of kale by going into edit mode on this page.

It seems that to work that image file needs to have a name that is only one word, so keep that in mind.


Coming soon to an assignment near you:


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