Support Analysis Belina
  • I am not the only one. (263)
    • Talks about his troubles with his friends and acquaintances (literary types). They're having similar experiences. Evidence, building credibility
    • Bruce Friedman-University of Michigan Medical School (blogs regularly about the use of computers in medicine) - Internet has altered his mental habits. Verification, activating reasoning
    • Quotes Friedman multiple times to support his claim. Evidence/Verification, building credibility and activating reasoning
  • Anecdotes alone don't prove much. (264)
    • Still awaiting long-term neurological and psychological experiments on how Internet use affects cognition. Illustration, evoking emotion
    • Study published from scholars at University College London to support his claim. suggests that we may as well be in the midst of a sea change in the way we read and think. Evidence/Verification, building credibility
    • Explains what the study was about and how it related to his topic of argument. Verification, building credibility and activating reasoning
    • Produces a direct quote from the authors of the study. Evidence/Verification, building credibility and activating reasoning
  • The human brain is almost infinitely malleable. (265)
    • Uses a past belief of the way brains work to strengthen his argument through falsification. Verification, building credibility and activating reasoning
    • "James Olds, a professor of neuroscience who directs the Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study at George Mason University, says that even the adult mind "is very plastic."" Evidence/Verification, building credibility and activating reasoning
    • Continues quoting Olds to support his argument. Verification, building credibility and activating reasoning

On page 267, Carr states Google's assumption that "we'd all be better off if our brains were supplemented, or even replaced, by an artificial intelligence is unsettling." I don't like how Carr went about stating this because he did not give one piece of evidence to support his statement of Google's assumption. This leads me to ask the questions: Is it really Google's assumption? Is Carr blowing their alleged assumption out of proportion? Why does Carr use "suggest" in the sentence following the assumption? He didn't give any facts supporting that this was ACTUALLY Google's assumption, then he goes on to make assumptions based on Google's assumption. I would like to see more evidence to support this claim instead of blindly following the claim that Google wants to replace our brains with artificial intelligence.

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